Great examples of company mission statements

10 Great Examples of Company Mission Statements

In this article guest author, Chris Wagner discusses 10 great examples of company mission statements and shares a few interesting facts to know about them.

“Don’t be Evil” was the motto suggested by employee Paul Buchheit when Google was only a garage project. It wasn’t an inside joke by the soon-to-be conglomerate, it was an actual code of conduct to never use unethical routes of trade.

What this means is that beyond all the corporate meetings, guys in suits, powerpoint presentations, graphs, flowcharts, coffee, brunches, crunches, and the power-lunches; there are actual people in a company.

As cliché as that may sound, company mission statements aren’t only those extra few words that accompany the brand name. Agendas become part of a brand’s identity. And talking of brands, naming a company takes a lot of effort. 

Hence, for which we have Business Name Generators to take care of this aspect while you might be busy coming up with a great company statement.

So, today, let’s sit back and take a look at some wholesome company mission statements that tell us about a company’s motivation to work everyday and provide value to society.

Intel

“Utilize the power of Moore’s Law to bring smart, connected devices to every person on earth.”

Intel is the biggest computer processor manufacturing company in the world, and it might just be powering your computer right now.

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Moore’s Law is the hypothesis that processor technology is doubly improved upon every 2 years, which is what Intel has upheld since its onset.

Walmart

“We save people money so they can live better.”

Walmart’s mission statement is, in our opinion, a little absurd in a way that ‘saving money’ and ‘living better’ don’t directly correlate. But what it probably means is that money saving in itself is a healthy living habit.

Even though it sounds simple, it could be difficult to get in a second. Walmart being the retail equivalent of amazon, very much likes to cater to the daily shopper.

L’Oreal

“Offering all women and men worldwide the best of cosmetics innovation in terms of quality, efficacy and safety”

So, ‘We’re Worth it’ isn’t their official motto. L’Oreal is the biggest cosmetics company in the world, and has revenue way well over in the billions.

Notice how they use women first, instead of men as in the usual etiquette? That’s intentional due to their agenda of putting women forward.

Ferrari

“To make unique sports cars that represent the finest in Italian design and craftsmanship, both on the track and on the road.”

Considered to be the best of Italian engineering, Ferrari has blazed records both in race tracks as well as consumer satisfaction. What makes it a masterpiece is decades of innovation by its renowned engineers.

What makes it unique? Well, Ferrari was one of the first companies ever to bring the V12 engines into the consumer market.

Nike

“Bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete in the world. If you have a body, you are an athlete.”

You bet we were putting Nike on this list! Even the name alone gives you a feel of an athlete. Nike is fluent in making footwear, clothing and sports accessories, and sells 900 millions of those annually.

Did you know that the words ‘Just do it’ were a serial killer’s last words before execution? Seems like Nike just ran with it & stuck ever since. 

Kickstarter

“To help bring creative projects to life.”

Of all the companies we talk about, Kickstarter is one that gives life to ideas that turn into businesses. More than 5 million people have successfully crowdfunded their projects till date.

The thing that makes Kickstarter special is that it gives every person to power their ideas without relying on any external financial institution. 

Tesla

“To accelerate the world’s transition to sustainable energy.”

Tesla Motors was the brainchild of the real-life tony stark: Elon Musk. Musk had a predetermined goal to make electric cars as affordable and fun (if not better) as gasoline cars.

Being the world’s top electric motors company, Tesla bears no cost on marketing, and relying solely on word-of-mouth and the fact that people who are truly into electric cars would eventually know about the company.

Tesla company mission statement

Image: Unsplash

TED Conferences

“Spread Ideas

It’s just that simple. TED organises global conferences with inspiring speakers, innovators, inventors, sportspersons, record holders of all kinds, celebrities, scientists, psychologists or what have you to do one thing: Spread Ideas.

TED also allows the free flow sharing of all their conference videos on Youtube, which has given into increased attendance to conferences every year.

Wikipedia

“Wikipedia’s purpose is to benefit readers by acting as an encyclopedia, a comprehensive written compendium that contains information on all branches of knowledge.”

Wikipedia is the world’s biggest community-driven multilingual encyclopedia, made of open source developers and voluntary editors. Editors have retouched around 17 million articles over a billion times to keep up-to-date references.  

Beyond being a hive of all knowledge, there have been speculation that Wikipedia might shut down due to reasons like lack of funds or change in internet policies. What will we do without Wikipedia?

Chanel

“To be the Ultimate House of Luxury, defining style and creating desire, now and forever.”

Chanel is the epitome of luxury. Other than handbags, Chanel makes clothes, fragrances, and watches. The ‘little black dress’ was Coco Chanel’s own ‘Ford Model T’ as it changed fashion forever. 

Chanel introduced pants for women, which was considered a bold move at the time. It turned out to be successful, inspiring the future generation of fashion designers to be risk-takers.

In Summary

Okay, so good company mission statements are important and all, but how does a company get around making their own? Well, after going through all the ones above, a few things:

  • What is your company about?
  • How does your company provide value?
  • Why does society need your company?

These might be pretty simple to answer but a bit tough to put into an agenda. With a little bit of thought and a brainstorm of ideas, it could be figured out. Just remember to use commas and a full-stop only at the end.

About the Author

Chris Wagner is the Head of Content at HostingPill. He regularly writes about Hosting, Web servers and WordPress. He has more than nine years industry experience.